Website policy

We provide links to articles we think will be of interest to our supporters. We are sympathetic to much of the content of what we post, but not to everything. The fact that something has been linked to here does not necessarily mean that we endorse the views expressed in it.


BSST is the leading charity focusing on small-scale grass roots cross community, anti poverty and humanitarian projects in Israel/Palestine

JfJfP comments


06 May: Tair Kaminer starts her fifth spell in gaol. Send messages of support via Reuven Kaminer

04 May: Against the resort to denigration of Israel’s critics


23 Dec: JfJfP policy statement on BDS

14 Nov: Letter to the Guardian about the Board of Deputies

11 Nov: UK ban on visiting Palestinian mental health workers

20 Oct: letter in the Guardian

13 Sep: Rosh Hashanah greetings

21 Aug: JfJfP on Jeremy Corbyn

29 July: Letter to Evening Standard about its shoddy reporting

24 April: Letter to FIFA about Israeli football

15 April: Letter re Ed Miliband and Israel

11 Jan: Letter to the Guardian in response to Jonathan Freedland on Charlie Hebdo


15 Dec: Chanukah: Celebrating the miracle of holy oil not military power

1 Dec: Executive statement on bill to make Israel the nation state of the Jewish people

25 Nov: Submission to All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism

7 Sept: JfJfP Executive statement on Antisemitism

3 Aug: Urgent disclaimer

19 June Statement on the three kidnapped teenagers

25 April: Exec statement on Yarmouk

28 Mar: EJJP letter in support of Dutch pension fund PGGM's decision to divest from Israeli banks

24 Jan: Support for Riba resolution

16 Jan: EJJP lobbies EU in support of the EU Commission Guidelines, Aug 2013–Jan 2014


29 November: JfJfP, with many others, signs a "UK must protest at Bedouin expulsion" letter

November: Press release, letter to the Times and advert in the Independent on the Prawer Plan

September: Briefing note and leaflet on the Prawer Plan

September: JfJfP/EJJP on the EU guidelines with regard to Israel

14th June: JfJfP joins other organisations in protest to BBC

2nd June: A light unto nations? - a leaflet for distribution at the "Closer to Israel" rally in London

24 Jan: Letter re the 1923 San Remo convention

18 Jan: In Support of Bab al-Shams

17 Jan: Letter to Camden New Journal about Veolia

11 Jan: JfJfP supports public letter to President Obama

Comments in 2012 and 2011



Palestinian society and politics: General introduction

Page last updated 26 Oct 2015

General Introduction

In 1948 an emergent Palestinian nation pressing for decolonisation and independence, suffered the nakba, the catastrophe, in which around four-fifths of the population in the part of mandate Palestine that became green-line Israel were expelled or left in fear, never to be allowed to return. Palestinian society was fragmented, divided among those living as “full” citizens within Israel; those in the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, subject initially to Egyptian and Jordanian rule, to be followed from June 1967 by Israeli occupation; and those in the Palestinian diaspora.

Much of what has happened to those in Israel and in the occupied territories is covered elsewhere in these background pages, but it is important to see things in the round. Palestinian society, despite its tragedies and traumas, is nonetheless held together by a strong sense of national identity and at the very least by a strong moral commitment to the right of return, even if many Palestinians in Western Europe and north America are well integrated into other societies and would probably not choose to return. This does not apply to those still living in appalling conditions in refugee camps in the wider Middle East and provided for by the United Nations Works and Relief Agency (Unwra).

There is very good general introduction available in Joel S. Migdal & Baruch Kimmerling’s The Palestinian People: A History (Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2003), but none of it appears to be available online. Indeed this is true of a number of academic volumes dealing with different aspects of Palestinian life.

What we will be attempting to do in these pages is to assemble links to articles dealing with the complicated realities of a Palestinian nation dispersed and living in very varied conditions in different countries. Most writings on the Palestinian question focus, perhaps inevitably, on the condition of those under Israeli occupation and secondarily on those discriminated against in Israel. Fewer focus on the miserable conditions of Palestinians in the refugee camps of Lebanon and Syria.

The material we have in this section is currently organised under these headings:

Palestinian political institutions
Palestinian civil society
Palestinian refugees

It is complemented by a whole lot of material  bearing directly on the conflict, the occupation and Palestinian citizens of Israel. This is scattered throughout, but see these sections and subsections in particular:

Origins and background to the conflict (where there is a page dealing with the issue)
The occupation
Palestinian citizens of Israel
The nature of the nakba

If you come across material you think should be in this section please let us know.


Palestinian political institutions

1.a) The Palestine Liberation Organization
Official webpage of “The Permanent Observer Mission of the State of Palestine to the United Nations

“The PLO was established in 1964 and has been the embodiment of the Palestinian national movement. It is a broad national front, or an umbrella organization, comprised of numerous organizations of the resistance movement, political parties, popular organizations, and independent personalities and figures from all sectors of life. The Arab Summit in 1974 recognized the PLO as the ‘sole and legitimate representative of the Palestinian people’ and since then the PLO has represented Palestine at the United Nations, the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries (NAM), the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), and in many other fora. In addition to its broad national and political goals, the PLO has dealt with numerous tasks with regard to the life of the Palestinian people in their main communities and throughout the world through the establishment of several institutions in such realms as health, education and social services. As such, the PLO is more than a national liberation movement striving to achieve the national goals of the Palestinian people, including the independence of the State of Palestine with East Jerusalem as its capital.”

b) Palestine Liberation Organization
Glenn E. Robinson, The Oxford Encyclopedia of the Islamic World, nd


Palestinian civil society

1. PASSIA – The Palestinian Academic Society for the Study of international Affairs

A research website that provides a large amount of useful information about Palestinian society including a Dictionary of Palestinian Political Terms, running from the Absentee Property Law to the Wye Valley Memorandum; and a Facts and Figures section, covering a wide range of topics in the oPt such as geography, economy, education, health, government & administration and more.

The information here has been recently updated (2015) so these pages should be a first port of call for statistical and factual information about any aspect of Palestinian society.


2. Civil Society in Palestine: Approaches, Historical Context and the Role of the NGOs
Walid Salem, Palestine-Israel Journal, Vol. 18 No. 2 & 3, 2012 / Civil Society Challenges 2012

A critical overview of the role of Palestinian NGOs, arguing that they need to develop a clear-cut political position and direct it toward both the issue of the occupation and the splits and divisions within Palestinian society


4. Civil Society and Political Elites in Palestine and the Role of International Donors: A Palestinian View
Salah Abdel Shafi, Gaza Community Mental Health Programme (GCMHP), Jul 2004

An appraisal of the development, functioning and role of Palestinian civil society, and suggestions for its future direction.


5. Rule of Law in Palestinian Society and Politics
Raja Bahlul, Jura Gentium, 2002

“Having no state of their own, and being ruled by non-Palestinian government throughout the entirety of their modern history, the Palestinians were in no position to initiate the social and political developments which could have hastened the transition of society form the traditional phase to the somewhat more modern phase, as was the case in neighboring Arab societies. It is not surprising that the ‘notable class’ (consisting of the heads of traditionally powerful clans and families) retained its superior position in Palestinian society, whereas it was overthrown in much of the Arab world in the post-independence period.”


6. Clans and Militias in Palestinian Politics
Prof. Dror Ze’evi, Crown Center for Middle East Studies, Brandeis University, c.2–7, Feb 2008

“In sum, if it is to succeed in establishing a functioning government and in concluding an agreement, the Palestinian Authority may find it necessary to ally itself with the families of the West Bank and Gaza—and, in a sense, to share governmental power with them. Indeed, efficient incorporation of some clans may be critical for success. Yet, we should also bear in mind that sharing power with the clans comes at a steep price.”


7. Changes in Palestinian society
Ehud Ein Gil and Aryeh Finkelstein, Khamsin no 6, May 1977

An analysis of the institutions of Palestinian village society, written three decades after the nakba, but still with contemporary relevance. It argued that such institutions had drawn their strength from specific economic conditions, conditions now destroyed. But Zionist policy aimed to preserve the traditional hamoulah structure of village society, in order to make it easier to keep the Palestinians under control. On the other hand, by expropriating the Palestinians’ lands, it has destroyed the economic basis of that very same traditional structure it wanted to preserve. Despite all this, the hamoulah had not collapsed and the authors saw it, religion, tradition and the conservative customs as enemies of Palestinian liberation.


Palestinian refugees

1. Palestinian refugees
UNWRA (United National Works and Relief Agency)

Palestinian refugees are defined as “persons whose normal place of residence was Palestine during the period 1 June 1946 to 15 May 1948, and who lost both home and means of livelihood as a result of the 1948 conflict.”

UNRWA services are available to all those living in its area of operations who meet this definition, who are registered with the Agency and who need assistance.

This is UNRWA’s offical website.


2. Palestinian Refugees
Palestinian Refugees ResearchNet, based at McGill Unviersity

A website that provides an overview of the refugee situation in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria as well as in the West Bank and Gaza with links to pages on Refugees in the Middle East Peace Process and Resolving the Refugee Question: Key Issues


3. MIDDLE EAST: Palestinian refugee numbers/whereabouts
IRIN, an independent, non-profit media organisation, June 2010.

“For the past 62 years, millions of Palestinians have been living as refugees in areas of the occupied Palestinian territory (oPt) and in surrounding host countries – mostly in Jordan, Lebanon and Syria. The UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) has described their plight as ‘by far the most protracted and largest of all refugee problems in the world today’. IRIN takes a fresh look at their number and whereabouts.

The overwhelming majority of Palestinians live in the Middle East. UNRWA operates in Jordan, Lebanon, Syria and the occupied Palestinian territory. There are also sizeable numbers of refugees living in Iraq, Egypt and outside the Middle East…”


See also the page The Palestinian refugees in the Origins of and Background to the Conflict section.


Print Friendly