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We provide links to articles we think will be of interest to our supporters. We are sympathetic to much of the content of what we post, but not to everything. The fact that something has been linked to here does not necessarily mean that we endorse the views expressed in it.
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BSST

BSST is the leading charity focusing on small-scale grass roots cross community, anti poverty and humanitarian projects in Israel/Palestine
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JfJfP comments


2016:

06 May: Tair Kaminer starts her fifth spell in gaol. Send messages of support via Reuven Kaminer

04 May: Against the resort to denigration of Israel’s critics

2015:

23 Dec: JfJfP policy statement on BDS

14 Nov: Letter to the Guardian about the Board of Deputies

11 Nov: UK ban on visiting Palestinian mental health workers

20 Oct: letter in the Guardian

13 Sep: Rosh Hashanah greetings

21 Aug: JfJfP on Jeremy Corbyn

29 July: Letter to Evening Standard about its shoddy reporting

24 April: Letter to FIFA about Israeli football

15 April: Letter re Ed Miliband and Israel

11 Jan: Letter to the Guardian in response to Jonathan Freedland on Charlie Hebdo

2014:

15 Dec: Chanukah: Celebrating the miracle of holy oil not military power

1 Dec: Executive statement on bill to make Israel the nation state of the Jewish people

25 Nov: Submission to All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism

7 Sept: JfJfP Executive statement on Antisemitism

3 Aug: Urgent disclaimer

19 June Statement on the three kidnapped teenagers

25 April: Exec statement on Yarmouk

28 Mar: EJJP letter in support of Dutch pension fund PGGM's decision to divest from Israeli banks

24 Jan: Support for Riba resolution

16 Jan: EJJP lobbies EU in support of the EU Commission Guidelines, Aug 2013–Jan 2014

2013:

29 November: JfJfP, with many others, signs a "UK must protest at Bedouin expulsion" letter

November: Press release, letter to the Times and advert in the Independent on the Prawer Plan

September: Briefing note and leaflet on the Prawer Plan

September: JfJfP/EJJP on the EU guidelines with regard to Israel

14th June: JfJfP joins other organisations in protest to BBC

2nd June: A light unto nations? - a leaflet for distribution at the "Closer to Israel" rally in London

24 Jan: Letter re the 1923 San Remo convention

18 Jan: In Support of Bab al-Shams

17 Jan: Letter to Camden New Journal about Veolia

11 Jan: JfJfP supports public letter to President Obama

Comments in 2012 and 2011

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Posts

Most Recently Published Books

RECENT BOOKS RELATING TO ISRAEL/PALESTINE

It is planned to try to update this section every 3 to 4 months. Please contact us if you have any comments or ideas for new books to be included in a future posting.

When the page is updated, all books previously posted on this page are transferred to a set of pages organised under the following headings:

1. MEMOIRS/BIOGRAPHY/ORAL TESTIMONIES
2. THE ARTS – FICTION/POETRY/PHOTOGRAPHY
3. HISTORY
4. CURRENT AFFAIRS/POLITICS

 

RECENT BOOKS RELATING TO ISRAEL/PALESTINE
 

Posted 20th June 2016

MEMOIRS/BIOGRAPHY/ORAL TESTIMONIES

Anthony David: An Improbable Friendship: The story of Yasser Arafat’s mother-in-law, the wife of Israel’s top general and their 40-year mission of peace (2015)

Ben Ehrenreich: The way to the spring: Life and death in Palestine (2016)

Salman Abu Sitta: Mapping my return: A Palestinian memoir (2016)

 

THE ARTS – FICTION/POETRY/PHOTOGRAPHY

Susan Muaddi Darraj: A curious land: Stories from home (2015)

Lilas Taha: Bitter almonds (2015)

Jemma Wayne: Chains of sand (2016)

 

HISTORY

Yakov Rabkin: What is modern Israel? (Pluto Press, 2016, paperback, £16.99)

Milton Vorst: Zionism: The birth and transformation of an ideal (2016)

 

CURRENT AFFAIRS/POLITICS

Yossi Alpher: No end of conflict: Rethinking Israel-Palestine (2016)

Jon Soske & Sean Jacobs (Eds.): Apartheid Israel: The politics of an analogy (2015)

Dov Waxman: Trouble in the tribe: The American Jewish conflict over Israel (2016)

Bill Williamson: Place is the passion: Reframing the Israel/Palestine conflict (2016)

 

MEMOIRS/BIOGRAPHY/ORAL TESTIMONIES

Anthony David: An Improbable Friendship: The story of Yasser Arafat’s mother-in-law, the wife of Israel’s top general and their 40-year mission of peace (Simon & Schuster, 2015, £16.99)

Publisher’s description: An Improbable Friendship is the dual biography of Israeli Ruth Dayan (…) who was Moshe Dayan’s wife for thirty-seven years, and Palestinian journalist Raymonda Tawil, Yasser Arafat’s mother-in-law (…). It reveals for the first time the two women’s surprising and secret forty-year friendship and delivers the story of their extraordinary and turbulent lives growing up in a war-torn country. Based on personal interviews, diaries, and journals drawn from both women – Ruth lives today in Tel Aviv, Raymonda in Malta – author Anthony David delivers a fast-paced, fascinating narrative that is a beautiful story of reconciliation and hope in a climate of endless conflict. By telling their stories and following their budding relationship, which began after the Six-Day War in 1967, we learn the behind-the-scenes, undisclosed history of the Middle East’s most influential leaders from two prominent women on either side of the ongoing conflict.

Reviews: Publisher’s Weekly

 

Ben Ehrenreich: The way to the spring: Life and death in Palestine (Granta Books, 2016, paperback, £!4.99)

Publisher’s description: Over the past three years, American writer Ben Ehrenreich has been traveling to and living in the West Bank, staying with Palestinian families in its largest cities and its smallest villages. (…) We are familiar with brave journalists who travel to bleak or war-torn places on a mission to listen and understand, to gather the stories of people suffering from extremes of oppression and want (…). Palestine is, by any measure, whatever one’s politics, one such place. Ruled by the Israeli military, set upon and harassed constantly by Israeli settlers who admit unapologetically to wanting to drive them from the land, forced to negotiate an ever more elaborate and more suffocating series of fences, checkpoints, and barriers that have sundered home from field, home from home, this is a population whose living conditions are unique, and indeed hard to imagine. In a great act of bravery, empathy and understanding, Ehrenreich, by placing us in the footsteps of ordinary Palestinians and telling their story with surpassing literary power and grace, makes it impossible for us to turn away.

Reviews: Electronic Intifada
Guardian

 

Salman Abu Sitta: Mapping my return: A Palestinian memoir (American University in Cairo Press, 2016, £29.95)

Publisher’s description: Salman Abu Sitta, who has single-handedly made available crucial mapping work on Palestine, was just ten years old when he left his home near Beersheba in 1948, but as for many Palestinians of his generation, the profound effects of that traumatic loss would form the defining feature of his life from that moment on. In this rich and moving memoir, Abu Sitta draws on oral histories and personal recollections to vividly evoke the vanished world of his family and home from the late nineteenth century to the eve of the British withdrawal from Palestine and subsequent war. Alongside accounts of an idyllic childhood spent on his family’s farm estate Abu Sitta gives a personal and very human face to the dramatic events of 1930s and 1940s Palestine, conveying the acute sense of foreboding felt by Palestinians as Zionist ambitions and militarization expanded under the mandate. (…) Abu Sitta’s narrative is imbued throughout with a burning sense of justice, a determination to recover and document what rightfully belongs to his people, an aim given poignant expression in his painstaking cartographic and archival work on Palestine, for which he is justifiably acclaimed.

Reviews: Mondoweiss
Guardian

 

THE ARTS – FICTION/POETRY/PHOTOGRAPHY

Susan Muaddi Darraj: A curious land: Stories from home (University of Massachusetts Press, 2015, £22.95)

Publisher’s description: Susan Muaddi Darraj’s short story collection about the inhabitants of a Palestinian West Bank village, Tel al-Hilou, spans generations and continents to explore ideas of memory, belonging, connection, and, ultimately, the deepest and richest meaning of home. A Curious Land gives voice to the experiences of Palestinians in the last century.

Reviews: Electronic Intifada
Necessary Fiction

 

Lilas Taha: Bitter almonds (Bloomsbury Qatar, 2015, paperback, £11.99)

Publisher’s description: Omar is an orphaned Palestinian born into chaos and driven by forces beyond his control to find his place in the world. He has only one thing to hold on to: a love that propels him forward. Nadia is young and idealistic. Her attempts to be oblivious to the bleak reality in Damascus are thwarted by her cowardly brother. Will she be able to break out of her traditional social mould to create her own destiny? Heartbreaking and moving, Bitter Almonds is about displacement and exile, family duty and honour, and the universal feelings of love and loss.

Reviews: Middle East Monitor
The National

 

Jemma Wayne: Chains of sand (Legend Press, 2016, paperback, £8.99)

Publisher’s description: At 26, Udi is a veteran of the Israeli army and has killed five men. He wants a new life in a new place. He has a cousin in England. Daniel is 29, a Londoner, an investment banker and a Jew. He wants for nothing, yet he too is unable to escape an intangible yearning for something more. And for less. He looks to Israel for the answer. But as the war with Hamas breaks out, Daniel cannot know that the star-crossed love of a Jewish girl and an Arabic man in Jerusalem a decade earlier, will soon complicate all that he thinks has become clear.

Reviews: none yet available

 

HISTORY

Yakov Rabkin: What is modern Israel? (Pluto Press, 2016, paperback, £16.99)

Publisher’s description: Few countries provoke as much passion and controversy as Israel. What is Modern Israel? convincingly demonstrates that its founding ideology – Zionism – is anything but a simple reaction to antisemitism. Dispelling the notion that every Jew is a Zionist and therefore a natural advocate for the state of Israel, the author points to the Protestant roots of Zionism, thus explaining the particular support Israel musters in the United States. Drawing on many overlooked pages of history (…) Yakov Rabkin shows that Zionism was conceived as a sharp break with Judaism and Jewish continuity. Israel’s past and present must be seen in the context of European ethnic nationalism, colonial expansion and geopolitical interests, rather than as an incarnation of Biblical prophecies or a culmination of Jewish history.

Reviews: Palestine Chronicle

 

Milton Vorst: Zionism: The birth and transformation of an ideal (Thomas Dunne, 2016, £18.99)

Publisher’s description: Viorst examines the evolution of Zionism, from its roots by serving as a cultural refuge for Europe’s Jews, to the cover it provides today for Israel’s exercise of control over millions of Arabs in occupied territories. Beginning with the shattering of the traditional Jewish society during the Enlightenment, Viorst covers the recent history of the Jews, from the spread of Jewish Emancipation during the French Revolution Era to the rise of the exclusionary anti-Semitism that overwhelmed Europe in the late nineteenth century. Viorst examines how Zionism was born and follows its development through the lives and ideas of its dominant leaders, who all held only one tenet in common: that Jews, for the first time in two millennia, must determine their own destiny to save themselves. But, in regards to creating a Jewish state with a military that dominates the region, Viorst argues that Israel has squandered the goodwill it enjoyed at its founding, and thus the country has put its own future on very uncertain footing.

Reviews: Jewish Book Council
Times of Israel

 

CURRENT AFFAIRS/POLITICS

Yossi Alpher: No end of conflict: Rethinking Israel-Palestine (Rowman & Littlefield, 2016, £24.95 )

Publisher’s description: Yossi Alpher, a veteran of peace process research and dialogue, explains how Israel got into its current situation of growing international isolation, political stalemate, and gathering messianic political influence. He investigates the inability of Israelis and Palestinians to make peace and end their conflict before suggesting not “solutions” (as there is no current prospect for a realistic comprehensive solution), but ways to moderate and soften the worst aspects of the situation and “muddle through” as Israel looks to a somber bi-national future. Alpher argues that a sober reassessment is long overdue in the way the West looks at the Israeli-Palestinian relationship. He submits that we have to stop talking about “the peace process” as if it still seriously exists, that 20 years of the Oslo process have failed for very substantial reasons that the professional peacemakers ignore at their risk, and that Israel is more likely to sink into a single-state reality than to remain truly “Jewish and democratic.” Yet, his is a non-ideological, no nonsense book. Israel will not disappear, will not become impoverished, and will still find strategic partners.

Reviews: Jewish Journal

 

Jon Soske & Sean Jacobs (Eds.): Apartheid Israel: The politics of an analogy (Haymarket Press, 2015, paperback, £11.99)

Publisher’s description: In Apartheid Israel: The Politics of an Analogy, twenty scholars of Africa and its diaspora reflect on the similarities and differences between apartheid-era South Africa and contemporary Israel, with an eye to strengthening and broadening today’s movement for justice in Palestine.

Reviews: none yet available

 

Dov Waxman: Trouble in the tribe: The American Jewish conflict over Israel (Princeton University Press, 2016, £22.95)

Publisher’s description: Trouble in the Tribe explores the increasingly contentious place of Israel in the American Jewish community. In a fundamental shift, growing numbers of American Jews have become less willing to unquestioningly support Israel and more willing to publicly criticize its government. More than ever before, American Jews are arguing about Israeli policies, and many, especially younger ones, are becoming uncomfortable with Israel’s treatment of Palestinians. Dov Waxman argues that Israel is fast becoming a source of disunity for American Jewry, and that a new era of American Jewish conflict over Israel is replacing the old era of solidarity. Drawing on a wealth of in-depth interviews with American Jewish leaders and activists, Waxman shows why Israel has become such a divisive issue among American Jews. (…) Waxman sets this conflict in the context of broader cultural, political, institutional, and demographic changes happening in the American Jewish community.

Reviews: Kirkus Reviews
History News Network

 

Bill Williamson: Place is the passion: Reframing the Israel/Palestine conflict (Comerford & Miller, 2016, paperback, £9.95)

Publisher’s description: Israel relies for its survival on its lucrative arms trade and American military support. Meanwhile, the Palestinians suffer poverty and destitution as an occupied nation. Indeed, were it not for vast international financial support, the Palestinians would face starvation. Any solution is impossible while Israel pursues an aggressive programme of settlement, expansion and ethnic cleansing. The author rejects the two state solution, which he likens to Apartheid. In a convincing fact-based analysis, he shows that a better future is achievable for both peoples: one that is secular, democratic, bi-national, culturally vibrant and economically successful.

Reviews: none yet available

 

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