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We provide links to articles we think will be of interest to our supporters. We are sympathetic to much of the content of what we post, but not to everything. The fact that something has been linked to here does not necessarily mean that we endorse the views expressed in it.
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BSST

BSST is the leading charity focusing on small-scale grass roots cross community, anti poverty and humanitarian projects in Israel/Palestine
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JfJfP comments


2016:

06 May: Tair Kaminer starts her fifth spell in gaol. Send messages of support via Reuven Kaminer

04 May: Against the resort to denigration of Israel’s critics

2015:

23 Dec: JfJfP policy statement on BDS

14 Nov: Letter to the Guardian about the Board of Deputies

11 Nov: UK ban on visiting Palestinian mental health workers

20 Oct: letter in the Guardian

13 Sep: Rosh Hashanah greetings

21 Aug: JfJfP on Jeremy Corbyn

29 July: Letter to Evening Standard about its shoddy reporting

24 April: Letter to FIFA about Israeli football

15 April: Letter re Ed Miliband and Israel

11 Jan: Letter to the Guardian in response to Jonathan Freedland on Charlie Hebdo

2014:

15 Dec: Chanukah: Celebrating the miracle of holy oil not military power

1 Dec: Executive statement on bill to make Israel the nation state of the Jewish people

25 Nov: Submission to All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism

7 Sept: JfJfP Executive statement on Antisemitism

3 Aug: Urgent disclaimer

19 June Statement on the three kidnapped teenagers

25 April: Exec statement on Yarmouk

28 Mar: EJJP letter in support of Dutch pension fund PGGM's decision to divest from Israeli banks

24 Jan: Support for Riba resolution

16 Jan: EJJP lobbies EU in support of the EU Commission Guidelines, Aug 2013–Jan 2014

2013:

29 November: JfJfP, with many others, signs a "UK must protest at Bedouin expulsion" letter

November: Press release, letter to the Times and advert in the Independent on the Prawer Plan

September: Briefing note and leaflet on the Prawer Plan

September: JfJfP/EJJP on the EU guidelines with regard to Israel

14th June: JfJfP joins other organisations in protest to BBC

2nd June: A light unto nations? - a leaflet for distribution at the "Closer to Israel" rally in London

24 Jan: Letter re the 1923 San Remo convention

18 Jan: In Support of Bab al-Shams

17 Jan: Letter to Camden New Journal about Veolia

11 Jan: JfJfP supports public letter to President Obama

Comments in 2012 and 2011

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Posts

Most Recently Published Books

RECENT BOOKS RELATING TO ISRAEL/PALESTINE

It is planned to try to update this section every 3 to 4 months. Please contact us if you have any comments or ideas for new books to be included in a future posting. When the page is updated, all books previously posted on this page are transferred to a set of pages organised under the following headings:

1. MEMOIRS/BIOGRAPHY/ORAL TESTIMONIES

2. THE ARTS – FICTION/POETRY/PHOTOGRAPHY

3. HISTORY

4. CURRENT AFFAIRS/POLITICS

 

Posted: 5th September 2017

MEMOIRS/BIOGRAPHY/ORAL TESTIMONIES

Hadar Lazar: Six singular figures: Jews & Arabs under the British Mandate (2106)

Anthony Robinson & Annemarie Young: Young Palestinians Speak: Living Under Occupation (2017)

Grant Rumley & Amir Tibon: The last Palestinian: The rise and reign of Mahmoud Abbas (2017)

 

THE ARTS – FICTION/POETRY/PHOTOGRAPHY

Maha Nassar: Brothers apart: Palestinian citizens of Israel and the Arab world (2017)

Ahdaf Soueif & Omar Robert Hamilton (Eds.): This Is Not A Border
Reportage & Reflection from the Palestine Festival of Literature (2017)

Lena Khalaf Tuffaha: Water & Salt (2107)

 

HISTORY

David Cronin: Balfour’s shadow: A century of British support for Zionism and Israel (2017)

Katerina Galor: Finding Jerusalem: Archaeology between science and ideology (2017)

Guy Laron: The Six-Day War: The breaking of the Middle East (2017)

Mohammed Omer & Petter Bauck: The Oslo Accords: A critical assessment (2016)

Elie Podeh: Chances for peace: Missed opportunities in the Arab-Israeli conflict (2016)

Bernard Regan: The Balfour Declaration: Empire, the Mandate and resistance in Palestine (2017)


CURRENT AFFAIRS/POLITICS

Ella Shohat: On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and other displacements (2017)

Matthew Vickery: Employing the enemy: The Story of Palestinian labourers on Israeli Settlements (2017)

 

MEMOIRS/BIOGRAPHY/ORAL TESTIMONIES

Hadar Lazar: Six singular figures: Jews & Arabs under the British Mandate (Mosaic Press, 2016, paperback, £19.99)

Publisher’s description: Six Singular Figures is the story of six people who lived and worked in Palestine in the 1930s; remarkable nonconformists who tried to find a solution to the deteriorating relations between Jews and Arabs, the two peoples living under British Mandate rule. Some took an active part in dialogues between the two peoples and believed that it was possible to live together, although they knew that the chances were slim. When World War II broke out, the contacts ended.

Reviews: none yet available

 

Anthony Robinson & Annemarie Young: Young Palestinians Speak: Living Under Occupation (Interlink Books, 2017, £16.99)

Publisher’s description: In Palestine today, a second generation of children and young people is growing up experiencing life under occupation. These are children who know only fear when they see an Israeli soldier or come across a roadblock.

This book provides a platform for children and young people, from all over this occupied land, to speak in their own voices about the day-to-day experience of living under occupation. It begins with an explanation of what the occupation means for those living under it, and is followed by the heart of the book: nine sections, each one focusing on one of the places visited by the authors. At the end, there is a timeline showing the main events that led up to the occupation.

As you read their words, you will see that what these young people want is a stable family life, security where they live, the freedom to move around their country, safety and space in which to grow up and dream of a future. They are just like young people everywhere; it is only the circumstances of their lives that are so different.

Reviews: Electronic Intifada
Middle East Monitor

 

Grant Rumley & Amir Tibon: The last Palestinian: The rise and reign of Mahmoud Abbas (Prometheus Books, 2017, £21)

Publisher’s description: Mahmoud Abbas rose to prominence as a top Palestinian negotiator, became the leader of his nation, and then tragically failed to negotiate a peace agreement. (…) Filled with new details and based on interviews with key figures in Ramallah, Jerusalem, and Washington, this book weaves together a fascinating story that will interest both veteran observers of the conflict and readers new to Israeli-Palestinian history. The authors (…) tell the inside story of Abbas’s complicated multi-decade relationship with America, Israel, and his own people. They trace his upbringing in Galilee, his family’s escape from the 1948 Israeli-Arab war, and his education abroad. (…) The authors pay special attention to the crucial years of 2005 to 2014, exploring such questions as: How did Abbas lose control of half of his governing territory and the support of more than half of his people? Why was Abbas the most prominent Palestinian leader to denounce terrorism? Why did Abbas twice walk away from peace offers from Israel and the U.S. in 2008 and 2014? And how did he turn himself from the first world leader to receive a phone call from President Obama to a person who ultimately lost the faith of the American president?

Reviews: Foreword (downloads as a PDF)
Washington Independent Review of Books

 

THE ARTS – FICTION/POETRY/PHOTOGRAPHY

Maha Nassar: Brothers apart: Palestinian citizens of Israel and the Arab world (Stanford UP, 2017, paperback, £20.99)

Publisher’s description: When the state of Israel was established in 1948, not all Palestinians became refugees: some stayed behind and were soon granted citizenship. Those who remained, however, were relegated to second-class status in this new country, controlled by a military regime that restricted their movement and political expression. For two decades, Palestinian citizens of Israel were cut off from friends and relatives on the other side of the Green Line, as well as from the broader Arab world. Yet they were not passive in the face of this profound isolation. Palestinian intellectuals, party organizers, and cultural producers in Israel turned to the written word. Through writers like Mahmoud Darwish and Samih al-Qasim, poetry, journalism, fiction, and nonfiction became sites of resistance and connection alike. With this book, Nassar examines their well-known poetry and uncovers prose works that have, until now, been largely overlooked. The writings of Palestinians in Israel played a key role in fostering a shared national consciousness and would become a central means of alerting Arabs in the region to the conditions—and to the defiance—of these isolated Palestinians.

Reviews: none yet available

 

Ahdaf Soueif & Omar Robert Hamilton (Eds.): This Is Not A Border Reportage & Reflection from the Palestine Festival of Literature (Bloomsbury, 2017, paperback, £16.99)

Publisher’s description: The Palestine Festival of Literature was established in 2008. Bringing together writers from all corners of the globe, it aims to help Palestinians break the cultural siege imposed by the Israeli military occupation, to strengthen their artistic links with the rest of the world, and to reaffirm, in the words of Edward Said, ‘the power of culture over the culture of power’. Celebrating the tenth anniversary of PalFest, This Is Not a Border is a collection of essays, poems and stories from some of the world’s most distinguished artists, responding to their experiences at this unique festival. Both heartbreaking and hopeful, their gathered work is a testament to the power of literature to promote solidarity and courage in the most desperate of situations.

Reviews: Kirkus Reviews

 

Lena Khalaf Tuffaha: Water & Salt (Red Hen Press, 2107, paperback, £12.99)

Publisher’s description: The poems in Water & Salt travel across borders between cultures and languages, between the present and the living past. These poems alternately rage, laugh, celebrate and grieve, singing in the voices of people ravaged by cycles of war and news coverage and inviting the reader to see the human lives lived beyond the headlines.

Reviews: Electronic Intifada
So to Speak Journal

 

HISTORY

David Cronin: Balfour’s shadow: A century of British support for Zionism and Israel (Pluto Books, 2017, paperback, £16.99)

Publisher’s description: This is the controversial history of the British government’s involvement in the Zionist project, from the Balfour Declaration in 1917 to the present day. Written by the British Foreign Secretary Arthur James Balfour, the Declaration stated `His Majesty’s government view with favour the establishment in Palestine of a national home for the Jewish people, and will use their best endeavours to facilitate the achievement of this object.’ Its impact on history has been immense and still reverberates a century later, starting what has been referred to as a hundred years of war against the Palestinian people. This history focuses on the devastating events which resulted from the Declaration, such as the Arab Revolt, the Nakba and establishment of the state, the 1956 and 1967 wars, the Cold War and the Oslo period.

Reviews: Global Research

 

Katerina Galor: Finding Jerusalem: Archaeology between science and ideology (University of California Press, 2017, paperback, £25, also available as free download here)

Publisher’s description: Archaeological discoveries in Jerusalem capture worldwide attention in various media outlets. The continuing quest to discover the city’s physical remains is not simply an attempt to define Israel’s past or determine its historical legacy. In the context of the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict, it is also an attempt to legitimate—or undercut—national claims to sovereignty. Bridging the ever-widening gap between popular coverage and specialized literature, Finding Jerusalem provides a comprehensive tour of the politics of archaeology in the city. Through a wide-ranging discussion of the material evidence, Galor illuminates the complex legal contexts and ethical precepts that underlie archaeological activity and the discourse of “cultural heritage” in Jerusalem. This book addresses the pressing need to disentangle historical documentation from the religious aspirations, social ambitions, and political commitments that shape its interpretation.

Reviews: none yet available

 

Guy Laron: The Six-Day War: The breaking of the Middle East (Yale University Press, 2017, £20)

Publisher’s description: An enthralling, big-picture history that examines the Six-Day War, its causes, and its enduring consequences against its global context

(…) Many scholars have documented how the Six-Day War unfolded, but little has been done to explain why the conflict happened at all. As we approach its fiftieth anniversary, Guy Laron refutes the widely accepted belief that the war was merely the result of regional friction, revealing the crucial roles played by American and Soviet policies in the face of an encroaching global economic crisis, and restoring Syria’s often overlooked centrality to events leading up to the hostilities. (…) In this important new work, Laron’s fresh interdisciplinary perspective and extensive archival research offer a significant reassessment of a conflict—and the trigger-happy generals behind it—that continues to shape the modern world.

Reviews: NY Review of Books
Financial Times

 

Mohammed Omer & Petter Bauck: The Oslo Accords: A critical assessment (American University in Cairo Press, 2016, paperback, £24.95)

Publisher’s description: More than twenty years have passed since Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization concluded the Oslo Accords, or Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements for Palestine. It was declared “a political breakthrough of immense importance.” Israel officially accepted the PLO as the legitimate representative of the Palestinian people, and the PLO recognized the right of Israel to exist. Critical views were voiced at the time about how the self-government established under the leadership of Yasser Arafat created a Palestinian-administered Israeli occupation, rather than paving the way towards an independent Palestinian state with substantial economic funding from the international community. Through a number of essays written by renowned scholars and practitioners, the years since the Oslo Accords are scrutinized from a wide range of perspectives.

Reviews: none yet available

 

Elie Podeh: Chances for peace: Missed opportunities in the Arab-Israeli conflict (University of Texas Press, 2016, paperback, £33)

Publisher’s description: This innovative reexamination of thirty pivotal episodes in the Arab-Israeli conflict, beginning with the 1919 Faysal-Weizmann Agreement and ending with the 2008 Abu Mazen-Olmert talks, reveals both missed opportunities and realistic possibilities to negotiate lasting peace.

Reviews: none yet available

 

Bernard Regan: The Balfour Declaration: Empire, the Mandate and resistance in Palestine (Verso, 2017, £16.99)

Publisher’s description: A hundred years after its signing, Bernard Regan recasts the history of the Balfour Declaration as one of the major events in the story of the Middle East. Offering new insights into the imperial rivalries between Britain, Germany and the Ottomans, Regan exposes British policy in the region as part of a larger geopolitical game. Yet, even then, the course of events was not straightforward and Regan charts the debates within the British government and the Zionist movement itself on the future of Palestine. The book also provides a revealing account of life in Palestinian society at the time, paying particular attention to the responses of Palestinian civil society to the imperial machinations that threatened their way of life. Not just a history of states and policies, Regan manages to brilliantly present both a history of people under colonialism and an account of the colonizers themselves.

Reviews: none yet available

 

CURRENT AFFAIRS/POLITICS

Ella Shohat: On the Arab-Jew, Palestine, and other displacements (Pluto Press, 2017, paperback, £20)

Publisher’s description: Spanning several decades, Shohat’s work has introduced conceptual frameworks that fundamentally challenged conventional understandings of Palestine, Zionism and the Middle East, focusing on the pivotal figure of the Arab-Jew. This book gathers together her most influential political essays, interviews, speeches, testimonies and memoirs, as well as previously unpublished material. Defying the binarist and Eurocentric Arab-versus-Jew rendering of the Israeli/Palestinian conflict, Shohat’s work has dared to engage with the deeper historical and cultural questions swirling around colonialism, Orientalism and nationalism. Shohat’s paradigm-shifting work unpacks such fraught issues as the anomalies of the national/colonial in Zionist discourse; the narrating of Jewish pasts in Muslim spaces; the links and distinctions between the dispossession of the Nakba and the dislocation of Arab-Jews; the traumatic memories triggered by partition and border-crossing; the echoes within Islamophobia of the anti-Semitic figure of ‘the Jew’; and the efforts to imagine a possible future inter-communal ‘convivencia’. Shohat’s transdisciplinary perspective illuminates the cultural politics in and around the Middle East. Juxtaposing texts of various genres written in divergent contexts, the book offers a vivid sense of the author’s intellectual journey

Reviews: none yet available

 

Matthew Vickery: Employing the enemy: The Story of Palestinian labourers on Israeli Settlements (Zed Books, 2017, paperback, £14.99)

Publisher’s description: How would it feel to build homes on land stolen from you? This bitter toil is the daily reality for many Palestinians. Currently, thousands of Palestinians are working in, and building, illegal Israeli settlements. This work entails a rejection of their legal rights, little to no job security, low wages and dangerous working conditions. Through a vivid and moving narrative, based on many conversations with these workers and their families, Vickery explores the rationale, emotions, thoughts and consequences of such employment. In doing so, he draws attention to a previously neglected aspect of the Palestinian experience and Israeli subjugation. This, coupled with an innovative and ground-breaking analysis of the Israeli government’s role in the settlement employment sector, exposes the true nature of these practices as a new, insidious form of state-sponsored forced labour.

Reviews: none yet available

 

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