Website policy


We provide links to articles we think will be of interest to our supporters. We are sympathetic to much of the content of what we post, but not to everything. The fact that something has been linked to here does not necessarily mean that we endorse the views expressed in it.
_____________________

BSST

BSST is the leading charity focusing on small-scale grass roots cross community, anti poverty and humanitarian projects in Israel/Palestine
____________________

JfJfP comments


2016:

06 May: Tair Kaminer starts her fifth spell in gaol. Send messages of support via Reuven Kaminer

04 May: Against the resort to denigration of Israel’s critics

2015:

23 Dec: JfJfP policy statement on BDS

14 Nov: Letter to the Guardian about the Board of Deputies

11 Nov: UK ban on visiting Palestinian mental health workers

20 Oct: letter in the Guardian

13 Sep: Rosh Hashanah greetings

21 Aug: JfJfP on Jeremy Corbyn

29 July: Letter to Evening Standard about its shoddy reporting

24 April: Letter to FIFA about Israeli football

15 April: Letter re Ed Miliband and Israel

11 Jan: Letter to the Guardian in response to Jonathan Freedland on Charlie Hebdo

2014:

15 Dec: Chanukah: Celebrating the miracle of holy oil not military power

1 Dec: Executive statement on bill to make Israel the nation state of the Jewish people

25 Nov: Submission to All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism

7 Sept: JfJfP Executive statement on Antisemitism

3 Aug: Urgent disclaimer

19 June Statement on the three kidnapped teenagers

25 April: Exec statement on Yarmouk

28 Mar: EJJP letter in support of Dutch pension fund PGGM's decision to divest from Israeli banks

24 Jan: Support for Riba resolution

16 Jan: EJJP lobbies EU in support of the EU Commission Guidelines, Aug 2013–Jan 2014

2013:

29 November: JfJfP, with many others, signs a "UK must protest at Bedouin expulsion" letter

November: Press release, letter to the Times and advert in the Independent on the Prawer Plan

September: Briefing note and leaflet on the Prawer Plan

September: JfJfP/EJJP on the EU guidelines with regard to Israel

14th June: JfJfP joins other organisations in protest to BBC

2nd June: A light unto nations? - a leaflet for distribution at the "Closer to Israel" rally in London

24 Jan: Letter re the 1923 San Remo convention

18 Jan: In Support of Bab al-Shams

17 Jan: Letter to Camden New Journal about Veolia

11 Jan: JfJfP supports public letter to President Obama

Comments in 2012 and 2011

_____________________

Posts

BBC documents price-tag youth boasting of doing God’s work

The report from Ynet is followed by an article by Jane Corbin who presented Panorama’s “Price Tag Wars”

BBC airs exposé on Hilltop Youth
Panorama magazine airs special report on settler group believed to be responsible for ‘price tag’ acts; says Israel helpless against ‘enemy within’

By Itamar Fleishman, Ynet news
September 23, 2012

The BBC airs a special report on the Hilltop Youth settler movement on Saturday showcasing a rare documentation of its members – who are believed to be responsible for the majority of “price tag” acts – in action.

The report cites both their controversial actions, as well as what it defined as Israel’s failure to effectively deal with “the enemy within.”

Hilltop Youth members refrain from dealing with the Israeli media, but the report, aired as part of BBC One’s Panorama magazine, showed many of them with their face clearly showing, as they erect illegal outposts and praise “price tag” acts.

The report said that the settler youths “carry out these crimes as an act of revenge” and further labeled them as “Jewish terrorists” that endanger the region’s stability.

One of the teens interviewed in the report said the Israeli public’s opinion of her actions is meaningless: “Faithless Jews who don’t fear God can call me a terrorist if they want. I don’t care what they say about me. I only care what God thinks. I act for him and him alone.”

Prime Minister’s Office spokesman Mark Regev stressed to the BBC that price-taggers would be stopped: “If these extremists succeed – if you have, heaven forbid, a mosque or something goes up in smoke, this could promote extremism on their side and you could have a terrible impact. We’ve got to stamp these phenomena out.”

The report notes that “For its part, Israel has formed a new taskforce to combat Jewish acts of extremism and says negotiating the future of the settlements will have to be part of the peace talks which they are ready to begin, without preconditions.”

Peace Now commented on the broadcast saying that “Those who carry out ‘price tag’ acts don’t only harm Israel from within – they also damage its international image.

“This report proves that if the authorities set their minds to it they could locate and punish the perpetrators. The responsibility is Bibi’s – not the BBC’s.”


‘Price-tag’ tactics of West Bank Jewish settlers

By Jane Corbin, BBC Panorama, West Bank
September 17, 2012

With their hoodies, covered faces and cans of spray paint, they may in some ways look like average teenage vandals out for a night of trouble.

But on the streets of Arab East Jerusalem, some young Jewish people are up to more than just graffiti. They are part of what has become known as “price-tag gangs” and they are risking their safety to send a very political message.

Price-tagging is the term they use for a range of acts, from vandalism to arson attacks and religious desecration.

They carry out these crimes as an act of revenge. Primarily, they are warning their own government that there is a price to pay for any attempt to give what they believe is Jewish land to the Palestinians as part of the fragile peace process.

But they also say there is a price to pay by Arabs for attacks on Jews.

The price-tag gangs come from the hilltops of the West Bank, Arab territory that has been occupied by Israel since the war of 1967.

‘Revenge’
Israeli homes built on occupied land are illegal according to international law, though Israel disputes this. Israel regards the West Bank as territory whose final status is yet to be determined and has built 120 settlements here – around 300,000 Israelis now live in the West Bank, excluding East Jerusalem.

But there are also 100 small outposts scattered on strategic hilltops some of which are illegal under Israeli law because they are built on private Palestinian land.

The hills are the battle ground for the hilltop youth – price tagging is their calling card and they have sworn to sacrifice all to prevent this land being given to the Palestinians.

Moriah Goldberg is one of them. The 20-year-old was captured on CCTV in February in a Palestinian village.

She slashed open sacks of building materials, cars were sprayed with graffiti saying “revenge” and insulting the Prophet Muhammad.

Moriah, who is under house arrest in the ultra nationalist Israeli settlement of Tapuach, in the West Bank, did not deny her actions.

“A ‘price tag’ means that when the government of Israel decides to evict a settlement, an outpost, even the smallest wooden shack in the land of Israel – it has a price. Maybe it will make them think twice before they do it again.”

The Israeli government’s move to label some of the price-taggers’ behaviour as acts of terrorism does not faze her.

“Faithless Jews who don’t fear God can call me a terrorist if they want. I don’t care what they say about me. I only care what God thinks. I act for him and him alone.”

Graffiti is not the only hallmark of the price-tagger. There has been violence and intimidation: Arab cars have been hit by petrol bombs and people seriously injured. Security cameras caught the torching of trucks in Palestinian villages and – perhaps most worrying for the security situation – there have been arson attacks on mosques in the West Bank and Israel.

One of the most provocative price tags so far was in February in the Palestinian village of Burka, where the mosque was attacked, prayer mats were burnt, insults sprayed and war declared on the walls.

The Israeli authorities say they are determined to put an end to this and orders have gone out to the police and security services.

Mark Regev, spokesman for Israeli Prime Minster Benjamin Netanyahu, said the price-taggers would be stopped.

“If these extremists succeed – if you have, heaven forbid, a mosque or something goes up in smoke, this could promote extremism on their side and you could have a terrible impact. We’ve got to stamp these phenomena out.”

Salam Fayyad, the Palestinian Authority’s Prime Minister, is blunt in his assessment of their actions: “Certainly at least in some aspect of what those violent settlers commit – there’s hardly any other way of describing it other than outright terrorism.”

Israel’s security forces are increasingly caught in the middle and the army has become a target of the hilltop youth as tensions rise.

Task force
One of the few price-taggers caught and successfully prosecuted is Alex Ostrovsky, 27, who was imprisoned for damaging vehicles in a military base. He is blunt in his view of his country’s security forces and police who carry out the demolition of illegal outposts.

“If someone destroys my home I don’t care if he’s Arab or Jew. As far as I’m concerned he destroyed my house and therefore he’s my enemy: a terrorist, a freedom fighter – depends where he is, who he’s with. It’s all the same thing. If calling me a terrorist helps me stay in my homeland, they can call me a terrorist.”

Amid the price-tagging and tension over Jewish settlement in the occupied West Bank, peace talks with the Palestinians aimed at establishing two states side-by-side, are frozen.

For the Palestinians, the continuing growth of the settlements – 50,000 new residents in the last three years – remains the biggest stumbling block.

Salam Fayyad said the price-tagging and delays over moves to evict settlers from illegal outposts are taking a toll on the peace process.

“I see the viability of what remains of the two-state solution… giving way under the heavy weight of that settlement enterprise and associated violence.”

For its part, Israel has formed a new taskforce to combat Jewish acts of extremism and says negotiating the future of the settlements will have to be part of the peace talks which they are ready to begin, without preconditions.

Regardless of what happens to the peace process the government knows it has to tackle the enemy within before Jewish militancy spirals out of control.

Jane Corbin presented Panorama: Price Tag Wars, BBC One, Monday, 17 September at 20:30 BST
Then available in the UK on the BBC iPlayer

Print Friendly

Comments are closed.