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JfJfP comments


2016:

06 May: Tair Kaminer starts her fifth spell in gaol. Send messages of support via Reuven Kaminer

04 May: Against the resort to denigration of Israel’s critics

2015:

23 Dec: JfJfP policy statement on BDS

14 Nov: Letter to the Guardian about the Board of Deputies

11 Nov: UK ban on visiting Palestinian mental health workers

20 Oct: letter in the Guardian

13 Sep: Rosh Hashanah greetings

21 Aug: JfJfP on Jeremy Corbyn

29 July: Letter to Evening Standard about its shoddy reporting

24 April: Letter to FIFA about Israeli football

15 April: Letter re Ed Miliband and Israel

11 Jan: Letter to the Guardian in response to Jonathan Freedland on Charlie Hebdo

2014:

15 Dec: Chanukah: Celebrating the miracle of holy oil not military power

1 Dec: Executive statement on bill to make Israel the nation state of the Jewish people

25 Nov: Submission to All-Party Parliamentary Group Against Antisemitism

7 Sept: JfJfP Executive statement on Antisemitism

3 Aug: Urgent disclaimer

19 June Statement on the three kidnapped teenagers

25 April: Exec statement on Yarmouk

28 Mar: EJJP letter in support of Dutch pension fund PGGM's decision to divest from Israeli banks

24 Jan: Support for Riba resolution

16 Jan: EJJP lobbies EU in support of the EU Commission Guidelines, Aug 2013–Jan 2014

2013:

29 November: JfJfP, with many others, signs a "UK must protest at Bedouin expulsion" letter

November: Press release, letter to the Times and advert in the Independent on the Prawer Plan

September: Briefing note and leaflet on the Prawer Plan

September: JfJfP/EJJP on the EU guidelines with regard to Israel

14th June: JfJfP joins other organisations in protest to BBC

2nd June: A light unto nations? - a leaflet for distribution at the "Closer to Israel" rally in London

24 Jan: Letter re the 1923 San Remo convention

18 Jan: In Support of Bab al-Shams

17 Jan: Letter to Camden New Journal about Veolia

11 Jan: JfJfP supports public letter to President Obama

Comments in 2012 and 2011

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Posts

As the vultures circle…

Netanyahu: Wikipedia.
 
 
King Bibi’s departure is a necessary step, but by no means enough. Only a revolution in thinking will generate change in Israel
 
Gideon Levy, Ha’aretz
Aug 05, 2017
 
Such happiness hasn’t been seen in Israel for a long time: Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is about to fall. The decent center-left is celebrating, in Tel Aviv suburbs like Ramat Hasharon the champagne is flowing. “The tyrant has fallen,” one commentator wrote. Some people hosted a festive barbecue.
 
For a moment it’s as if Elena and Nicolae Ceausescu have been executed, Muammar Gadhafi has been taken out, Saddam Hussein has been captured, the Berlin wall has fallen, Nelson Mandela has been freed and the Soviet Union has crumbled. Israel has gone from darkness to light, from slavery to freedom. Netanyahu’s going home, maybe to jail, and Israel is liberated.
 
The schadenfreude for Netanyahu and his family is understandable, and they deserve it. So is the joy over the possible end of his reign. We can understand the revelers who saw the destruction.
 
But how easy it is to put that all on Netanyahu. How convenient to think that it’s just him and not us. That everything is because of the ruler and not his voters and followers – most of the people. That Netanyahu was a tyrant and his fall means freedom.
 
How tempting it is to think that if only he’s replaced Israel will become a different country, like the one we dreamed of. That the morning after Netanyahu, the dawn that’s now breaking will be the dawn of a new day in which all the bad things will disappear as if they’ve never been. Hocus pocus – a different Israel.
 
How intoxicating it is to think that the person who replaces Netanyahu will be better than Netanyahu. That the next prime minister will bring hope. That the years of right-wing, nationalist and religious government are over, that whoever comes instead, even from the right wing, is preferable. That all the excellent and promising candidates are warming up on the starting line.
 
There is no doubt Star Trek has influenced some of the greatest technological creations. Now it has gone above and beyond …
 
That it can’t be worse than Netanyahu. That if we only get rid of King Bibi and the imperial family, Israel will become a more just place. That Israel without Netanyahu won’t be nationalist or racist, an occupier or corrupt, arrogant or violent. It’s not nice to be a party pooper, to spoil such rare joy, but getting swept away like this has no basis in reality.
 
Netanyahu bears a great deal of the blame for Israel’s situation, especially domestically. His years have been hard ones for justice, equality, freedom, peace, democracy and humaneness, as well as for minorities and the weak. These years have also been good for arrogance, brute force, recklessness, nationalism, violence and the settlements.
 
But as strong as he was, Netanyahu doesn’t bear the blame alone. There was a broad coalition around him, a weak opposition and a nation that supported him. As a sophisticated populist, Netanyahu didn’t mold the spirit of the people, he reflected it. He didn’t invent Israel as it is today. The people invented it.
 
The joy is exaggerated and premature, not because Netanyahu is about to exit, but because his exit heralds very little, if anything. It’s the first step on a long road and the destination isn’t clear. A necessary step, but by no means enough. Netanyahu’s departure isn’t critical.
 
Anyone-but-Netanyahu is the shallow, fleeting fashion of people who seek revenge and schadenfreude, whom we can understand but whose conclusions we don’t agree with. Netanyahu was never the demon he was depicted as, and getting rid of him will liberate us from nothing but his wife and son.
 
Netanyahu the horrible will go, and he will be replaced by Likud’s Gideon Sa’ar or Yesh Atid chief Yair Lapid; one is more extreme than the other and the other is more hollow – and they’re both worse than Netanyahu.
 
Netanyahu will go and the right-wing ministers Naftali Bennett, Ayelet Shaked and Avigdor Lieberman will stay. Netanyahu will go and the hatred of Arabs will stay. Netanyahu will go and the certainty that we’re a chosen people will stay. And most certain of all: Netanyahu will go and the occupation will stay, even if the unbelievable happens and Labor’s new leader, Avi Gabbay, becomes prime minister.
 
Hunger for vengeance and schadenfreude aren’t enough to change this reality. Nor is it enough just to replace the person at the top. To generate change, Israeli society has to undergo a painful process, no sign of which is on the horizon. Only a revolution in thinking will generate change. But for now this revolution has no one to implement it, with or without Netanyahu.
 
A great day is coming soon. Netanyahu is about to exit. A few Israelis will weep over his departure, but even fewer should be so happy about it. Netanyahu is going, and Israel is staying the way it was.
 
Gideon Levy
 
Haaretz Correspondent
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