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Posts

Messianics hope for End of Days with the end of Sharon

The story from WND is followed by one from Israel Today


Rabbi Ovadia Yosef (left) and Rabbi Yitzhak Kaduri on October 14, 2003. While Yosef had a reputation in Israel for Torah learning, Kaduri was revered by Christian fudamentalists and people in search of mystical experience largely in the US. Photo by Flash90

Ariel Sharon’s death sparks prophecy bombshell

A curse, a stroke and the end times prediction by venerated rabbi

By WND, (WorldNetDaily)
January 15, 2014

The death of former Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon last week has drawn attention to the prophecy of a venerated Jewish spiritual leader.

The connection sparked a new wave of interest in the book, sending it surging up the charts on Amazon. It now is the No. 1 seller in two categories that might seem contradictory.

It is both the top seller in the Judaism category and the New Testament category – an unprecedented achievement for a book of its kind.

The book is currently ranked No. 644 among all books on Amazon, and its companion documentary is also ranked highly on the charts. It is the eighth bestselling documentary at the moment.

Published by WND Books, “The Rabbi Who Found Messiah” documents one of the great mysteries of our time.

When Sharon was still in office, vibrant and in command of his faculties, a venerated rabbi, who claimed he had met the Messiah, predicted the Messiah would not come until after Sharon’s death.

Carl Gallups’ book, The Rabbi who found Messiah, published and pushed by WND, a conservative American website.

Rabbi Yitzhak Kaduri died shortly after Sharon suffered a stroke that left him comatose in 2006. But before the beloved Kaduri died, he wrote a cryptic note in which he named the Messiah with whom he claimed to have had a mystical encounter. On the 108-year-old rabbi’s instructions, the note was to be released a year after his death.

When the sealed note was opened a year later, it was posted on Kaduri’s website. Kaduri had revealed the Messiah’s name as Yehoshua, or the formal Hebrew pronunciation of Yeshua or Jesus.

s a result of the unusual prophetic twist and the recent release of a book and movie about the life and death of Kaduri, the death of Sharon has renewed interest among Christian prophecy circles around the world.

Sharon, 85, served as Israel’s prime minister from 2001 to 2006, when he became incapacitated. During his tenure, he initiated a disengagement plan in which thousands of Jews were deported from Gaza and northern Samaria, turning the once-fertile region over to Hamas control.

A “death curse” by a group of rabbis in Israel was issued against Sharon for the action.

Sharon suffered a serious stroke Jan. 4, 2006, and was comatose until his death.

“The only prophetic utterance of Kaduri concerning Ariel Sharon was that Messiah would not appear until Ariel Sharon had died,” said Gallups. “Within a little over two months after speaking these prophetic words Sharon was in a coma and Kaduri himself died.”

From America’s Last Days

Chuck Missler, founder of Koinonia House ministry, says that in the book, Gallups “explodes one of the biggest bombshells of our lifetime.”

“The implications of these astonishing declarations from the most venerated ultra-orthodox rabbi in Israel impacts every one of us – not just those of the traditional Jewish faith,” Missler said. “This is a must-read for anyone who takes God seriously.”

Both the book and the movie look at Kaduri’s many prophecies objectively – neither affirming nor denying their accuracy or authenticity. The book and the movie simply examine the remarkable story about the popular rabbi and his shocking messianic prophecy from a journalistic and biblical point of view.



From the apocalyptic, Christian Salvationist Omega Times

The Rabbi, the Note and the Messiah

By Aviel Schneider, Israel Today
May 30, 2013

This is a reprint of a cover story that first appeared in the April 2007 issue of Israel Today Magazine

A few months before he died, one of the nation’s most prominent rabbis, Yitzhak Kaduri, supposedly wrote the name of the Messiah on a small note which he requested would remain sealed until now. When the note was unsealed, it revealed what many have known for centuries: Yehoshua, or Yeshua (Jesus), is the Messiah.

With the biblical name of Jesus, the Rabbi and kabbalist described the Messiah using six words and hinting that the initial letters form the name of the Messiah. The secret note said:

Concerning the letter abbreviation of the Messiah’s name, He will lift the people and prove that his word and law are valid.

This I have signed in the month of mercy,

Yitzhak Kaduri

The Hebrew sentence (translated above in bold) with the hidden name of the Messiah reads:

Yarim Ha’Am Veyokhiakh Shedvaro Vetorato Omdim

ירים העם ויוכיח שדברו ותורתו עומדים

The initials spell the Hebrew name of Jesus יהושוע . Yehoshua and Yeshua are effectively the same name, derived from the same Hebrew root of the word “salvation” as documented in Zechariah 6:11 and Ezra 3:2. The same priest writes in Ezra, “Yeshua (ישוע) son of Yozadak” while writing in Zechariah “Yehoshua (יהושוע) son of Yohozadak.” The priest adds the holy abbreviation of God’s name, ho (הו), in the father’s name Yozadak and in the name Yeshua.

With one of Israel’s most prominent rabbis indicating the name of the Messiah is Yeshua, it is understandable why his last wish was to wait one year after his death before revealing what he wrote.

When the name of Yehoshua appeared in Kaduri’s message, ultra-Orthodox Jews from his Nahalat Yitzhak Yeshiva (seminary) in Jerusalem argued that their master did not leave the exact solution for decoding the Messiah’s name.

The revelation received scant coverage in the Israeli media. Only the Hebrew websites News First Class (Nfc) and Kaduri.net mentioned the Messiah note, insisting it was authentic. The Hebrew daily Ma’ariv ran a story on the note but described it as a forgery.

Jewish readers responded on the websites’ forums with mixed feelings: “So this means Rabbi Kaduri was a Christian?” and “The Christians are dancing and celebrating,” were among the comments.

Israel Today spoke to two of Kaduri’s followers in Jerusalem who admitted that the note was authentic, but confusing for his followers as well. “We have no idea how the Rabbi got to this name of the Messiah,” one of them said.

Yet others completely deny any possibility that the note is authentic.

In an interview with Israel Today, Rabbi David Kaduri, 80, the son of the late Rabbi Yitzhak Kaduri, denied that his father left a note with the name Yeshua just before he died. “It’s not his writing,” he said when we showed him a copy of the note. During a night-time meeting in the Nahalat Yitzhak Yeshiva in Jerusalem, books with Kaduri’s handwriting from 80 years ago were presented to us in an attempt to prove that the Messiah note was not authentic.

When we told Rabbi Kaduri that his father’s official website (www.kaduri.net) had mentioned the Messiah note, he was shocked. “Oh no! That’s blasphemy. The people could understand that my father pointed to him [the Messiah of the Christians].” David Kaduri confirmed, however, that in his last year his father had talked and dreamed almost exclusively about the Messiah and his coming. “My father has met the Messiah in a vision,” he said, “and told us that he would come soon.”

Kaduri’s Portrayal of the Messiah

A few months before Kaduri died at the age of 108, he surprised his followers when he told them that he met the Messiah. Kaduri gave a message in his synagogue on Yom Kippur, the Day of Atonement, teaching how to recognize the Messiah. He also mentioned that the Messiah would appear to Israel after Ariel Sharon’s death. (The former prime minister is still in a coma after suffering a massive stroke more than a year ago.) Other rabbis predict the same, including Rabbi Haim Cohen, kabbalist Nir Ben Artzi and the wife of Rabbi Haim Kneiveskzy.

Kaduri’s grandson, Rabbi Yosef Kaduri, said his grandfather spoke many times during his last days about the coming of the Messiah and redemption through the Messiah. His spiritual portrayals of the Messiah—reminiscent of New Testament accounts—were published on the websites Kaduri.net and Nfc:

“It is hard for many good people in the society to understand the person of the Messiah. The leadership and order of a Messiah of flesh and blood is hard to accept for many in the nation. As leader, the Messiah will not hold any office, but will be among the people and use the media to communicate. His reign will be pure and without personal or political desire. During his dominion, only righteousness and truth will reign.

“Will all believe in the Messiah right away? No, in the beginning some of us will believe in him and some not. It will be easier for non-religious people to follow the Messiah than for Orthodox people.

“The revelation of the Messiah will be fulfilled in two stages: First, he will actively confirm his position as Messiah without knowing himself that he is the Messiah. Then he will reveal himself to some Jews, not necessarily to wise Torah scholars. It can be even simple people. Only then he will reveal himself to the whole nation. The people will wonder and say: ‘What, that’s the Messiah?’ Many have known his name but have not believed that he is the Messiah.”

Farewell to a ‘Tsadik’

Rabbi Yitzhak Kaduri was known for his photographic memory and his memorization of the Bible, the Talmud, Rashi and other Jewish writings. He knew Jewish sages and celebrities of the last century and rabbis who lived in the Holy Land and kept the faith alive before the State of Israel was born.

Kaduri was not only highly esteemed because of his age of 108. He was charismatic and wise, and chief rabbis looked up to him as a Tsadik, a righteous man or saint. He would give advice and blessings to everyone who asked. Thousands visited him to ask for counsel or healing. His followers speak of many miracles and his students say that he predicted many disasters.

When he died, more than 200,000 people joined the funeral procession on the streets of Jerusalem to pay their respects as he was taken to his final resting place.

“When he comes, the Messiah will rescue Jerusalem from foreign religions that want to rule the city,” Kaduri once said. “They will not succeed for they will fight against one another.”

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